News & Updates

 

William Gillette as Sherlock HolmesWilliam Gillette as Sherlock Holmes

Ms. Magazine has started a blog series on early women filmmakers. First up, of course, is a blog on Alice Guy, by Kitty Lindsay.

Lindsay starts out by setting the terms for the blog series:

Spielberg. Scorsese. Tarantino. Lucas. Hitchcock.

 A blogger who identifies themselves only as PW1949 has been posted very erudite and carefully researched blogs on everything to do with the 19th Arrondissement in Paris. This includes the Buttes Chaumont area where the Gaumont Studios were.

If you can read French, I highly recommend visiting this blog. Even if you can't, the pictures and maps are great.

Some notable entries for Alice Guy lovers:

Only took eleven years!

At long last, The Lost Visionary will be available on Amazon as a Kindle book. Pub date is August 14, 2014, but you can pre-order the book now here.

A great article-length bio about Buster Keaton by Loren Kantor on Spice Today.

Why write about Buster Keaton in a blog dedicated to early cinema and Alice Guy? Because Herbert Blaché, Alice's husband, directed a few films in Hollywood before the transition to sound, and one of them was The Saphead, the first feature film starring Buster Keaton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thing that is true of all early cinema, silent cinema, and early talkies: without preservation and conservation, the films eventually disintegrate. That's if we even know where they are to begin with.

Alice Guy was born on July 1, 1873, in a Parisian suburb. It was the first day in what would be an incredible, adventurous, and ground-breaking life. 

For a complete chronology of her life and accomplishements, go here.

While doing research for a chapter on the Third Annual New York Exhibitors Ball of  1913 for Inventing the Movies, I had a sudden insight.

The New York Exhibitors Ball of 1913, third of its kind, was an event of extraordinary liminality, a crossroad between the old and new worlds of the cinema that even the thousands of film manufacturers and fans were probably not aware of at the time.