She Invented the Movies - News

REVIEWS OF BE NATURAL

In case you are new to this page, Be Natural is the feature-length documentary based, in part, on my book, Alice. Here is a link to the Be Natural Page that lists where the film can be seen in theaters this month and into June, both in the U.S. and internationally.

Here are links to some reviews:

Film Found! Secrets of the Night directed by Herbert Blaché

Secrets of the Night directed by Herbert Blaché

Mystery. Comedy. A murder in an old house where everyone is a suspect.

These are the building blocks of Secrets of the Night, a silent movie from 1924. For years, silent film enthusiasts thought the flick was lost, like more than 7,000 other films from the era. In fact, it was listed on the U.S. Library of Congress's list of lost films.

La Bella Romero

Although we can't be sure who filmed the 1905 Gaumont hand-colored movies La malagueña y el torero y Le Tango, we have identified one of the performers. La Bella Romero (real name, Elsa Romero) was born in Malaga in the late nineteenth century. By early 1902 she was dancing tangos and sevillanas in Madrid (El Globo (EG) 1902, Madrid, 3 January, 3). In 1903 she debuted at the Teatro Novedades in Barcelona, where she was a great success. Her fame continued to grow. She even performed with La Fornarina and appeared in films. 

Alice Guy's Film Journey Around Spain

The Journey

Alice Guy traveled around Spain for six weeks, from October 15th to the end of November of 1905,  filming in Barcelona, Madrid, Granada, Córdoba and Seville. Guy's mission was to film a series of chronophone films in Spanish and pave the way for Gaumont film distribution in Spain. Guy has also been tentatively credited with filming La Malagueña y el torero (1905) and Le Tango (1905) while on this journey.  Francisco Griñán has investigated her journey in a way never done before.

A beautiful view of the Belle Epoque through paintings

Pictured: Gallerie des machins, Expo Universelle 1889 Paris

The blog, "Five Minute History" recently published a lovely survey of the Belle Époque. The Blog includes pictures of buildings from Paris to Mexico (including the Biltmore in Asheville, NC) that represent the cultural achievements of the era.

Most wonderful for me is the film from paintings of Paris in the era.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How New York City looked when Alice Guy first arrived

A great compilation of videos is making its way around the web. Some of this footage shows NYC much as it looked when Alice Guy first arrived in 1907, though the footage is from 1911.

This is how Alice described NYC in her memoirs: